...
...
...

We have closed the door of our temporary home in Goes and looked back over our shoulder one more time as we passed passport control. With our last wave we realise ourselves quite well that we are leaving for two years.

 

 We submerge in the environment of a metal tube with wings and airport terminals and 33 hours later we set foot on the familiar mission field that is called Arnhem Land. We are amazed again by the miracle of air transport that takes us to the other side of the world in such a seemingly effortless and punctual way.

 

During the trip there are more experiences. Already in the last week of our furlough we add up our luggage: 92 kilos. Oops, on the domestic flight, the last stretch from Darwin to Milingimbi, our baggage allowance is only 70 kg! We calculated that we would have to pay about € 150 to be allowed to take this all. Still it appeared cheaper this way than sending it via mail and also cheaper than having to buy everything new (we take clothes for two years with us), so we took it all. At the check-in at Darwin we were indeed referred to the ticket counter to pay for the extra luggage. The lady worked it out and told us: "I've added it all up and you don't have to pay." We said: "Are you sure?" She said: "Yes, that's it." We thought to ourselves: "Well we really thought we had to pay, but if she says we don't." Later, when we were waiting at the gate, the lady came looking for us and told us: "You were right, you have to pay extra, but because it is my mistake you don't have to pay anything."!!! She wanted to warn us that we would have to pay on the way back. "Ma'm, this is our return flight."

Last week We asked our prayer team in The Netherlands and Australia to pray if the contacts with the Aboriginal family (that adopted us) could be continued. When we had boarded the small (30 seat) plane for the last stretch and René was stowing our carry-on luggage he suddenly stood  eye-to-eye with mrs. Garrawurra, the lady that adopted us. She travelled back as well after having worked in Darwin during our furlough!!!

These two moments left an impression with us as a blessing from God: "Welcome in Arnhem Land for another term of two yearsanother two years."

 

The other MAF family welcomed us at the airstrip and it was good to see each other again. bitter sweet though, because in three weeks they will leave for the main base and we will move into their house.

 

After arrival, we tucked ourselves into bed and slept for seventeen hours, from 6 till 11, with a few interruptions due to Judah.

Instagram

...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...